Movements

Description

The Gilded Age embodied the eclectic and pluralistic efforts of a nation searching for order and identity during a time of great change in industrialism and social class, and found it in an appropriated array of Old World and neoclassical styles that reinforced ideals of American cultural progress. Within the highlights of this collection, one will find the Avant-Garde and the Society of Independent Artists, emphasizing artistic diversity, personal experience, experimentation, and the unity of high and low culture; Keppel, Ederheimer, and the Etching Revival; and The Eight, a movement created by a group of artists to portray the daily realities of urban life and poverty in American society during an era represented by opulence and high classical art.

Title

Movements

Items in the Movements Collection

The print-collector's bulletin : an illustrated catalogue of painter-etchings for sale by Federick Keppel & Co.
"Whistler as Etcher," by Joseph Pennell. A selection of three pages outlining Whistler's experience as an etcher.

Complete catalog for 1916 exhibtion of etchings by Joseph Pennell, including a number of depictions of New York. The catalog includes hyperlinks to examples of the works shown in the exhibition.

The print-collector's bulletin : an illustrated catalogue of painter-etchings for sale by Federick Keppel & Co.
Two etchings, The Rag Gatherers & La Marchande de Moutard, by Whistler.

Brooklyn Society of Etchers presents a international exhibition of etching.
Cover for checklist of the first annual exhibition put on by the Brooklyn Society of Etchers, which included works by American artists of growing fame--like Mary Cassatt and Childe Hassam--alongside items from established European greats, such as…

Brooklyn Society of Etchers presents a international exhibition of etching.
Introductory note, "On the Mediums of Etching," Brooklyn Society of Etchers exhibition.

Annual exhibition : no jury, no prizes. (1922)
Page from 1922 checklist, shows the Society's adherence to placing no emphasis on the placement of items in the exhibition: "The exhibition is hung in alphabetical order, beginning at the entrance with the letter X which was drawn by lot."